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Fleeing & Eluding Attorney in Orlando, Florida

Is Fleeing from Police a Felony in Florida?

Fleeing and attempting to elude is a felony. The degree it's charged at depends on the circumstances of the case. The harshest penalties could be the fact that, unless your charge is reduced or you enter a pretrial diversion program, you will be adjudicated guilty and will be considered a convicted felon. This is true regardless of whether you have a criminal history.

If you or a loved one was charged with the criminal traffic offense of fleeing or attempting to elude, it is important that you contact a skilled Orlando defense lawyer who has knowledge and experience in handling these types of cases.

To discuss your circumstances with our attorney, call Z Law Firm.

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What Are the Penalties for Fleeing & Attempting to Elude?

The potential conviction penalties are as follows:

  • Third-degree felony: This is charged when a person flees or attempts to elude an officer driving a vehicle on which law enforcement insignia are prominently displayed and the sirens and lights are activated. The penalties include up to $5,000 in fines, up to 5 years of probation, and/or up to 5 years in state prison.

  • Second-degree felony: A person commits this degree of offense when they flee or attempt to elude a police officer driving a marked vehicle with lights and sirens activated, and the individual is speeding or showing a wanton disregard for the safety of others or property. A conviction could result in up to $10,000 in fines, up to 15 years of probation, and/or up to 15 years in prison.

  • First-degree felony: This is charged when a person is fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer in a marked car with lights and sirens activated, they are speeding or driving in a way that shows disregard for the safety of others or property, and they cause bodily injury or death. If the individual is found guilty, they could be punished by up to $15,000 in fines, up to 30 years of probation, and/or up to 30 years in state prison with a 3-year mandatory minimum sentence.

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Z Law Firm: Providing the Defense You Need

If you've been accused of fleeing or attempting to elude in Orlando, call our firm today. Our attorney has nearly 2 decades of experience and can help you understand your charges and legal options.